Novoo PowerCube Mini 5000 with Moto G6

Fast Charging USB-C Android Phones


  • Most Android phones support fast charging. The best standard for you depends on your model phone.




Phone battery life has not improved at the same rate as other features. Having an extra charger at work or a power bank in your bag is handy. But with a newer Android phone featuring USB-C your old USB-A charger isn’t ideal. As it doesn’t support fast charging. Fast charging standards work by increasing the voltage or current into your phone beyond what a regular USB charger can do. This gets your battery to 50-70% much faster.

Most USB-C Android phones support one fast charging standard or another. The included charger is usually a fast charger (even those USB-A ones). Most any USB-C charger will charge your phone, but it may not fast charge it. When shopping for additional chargers you need to look for what will best support your brand of Android phone.


PhoneSupported Fast Charging StandardCompatible Fast Charging Standards
Apple iPhone 8, X, XS, XRUSB Power DeliveryApple 2.4A

Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+
Essential PhoneUSB Power DeliveryQualcomm Quick Charge 4+
Google PixelUSB Power DeliveryQualcomm Quick Charge 4+
HTC U12 PlusQualcomm Quick Charge 3.0Anker PowerIQ 2.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+
Huawei Mate 10, 20, XHuawei SuperCharge, 22.5W
Huawei Mate 20 ProHuawei SuperCharge, 40W
Huawei P10, P20, P30Huawei SuperCharge, 22.5W
LG G6/G7Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0Anker PowerIQ 2.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+
LG V30Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0Anker PowerIQ 2.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+
LG V40
Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+Anker PowerIQ 2.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0
USB Power Delivery
Motorola Moto G6Motorola TurboPowerQualcomm Quick Charge 3.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+
Nokia 6.1 (2018)Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0Anker PowerIQ 2.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+
Nokia 8Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0Anker PowerIQ 2.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+
OnePlus 6TOnePlus Dash Charging
OnePlus 6T McLaren Edition
OnePlus 7 Pro
Warp Charge 30
Razer Phone 2Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+Anker PowerIQ 2.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0
USB Power Delivery
Red Hydrogen OneQualcomm Quick Charge 3.0Anker PowerIQ 2.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+
Samsung Galaxy Note 8, 9Samsung Adaptive Fast ChargingAnker PowerIQ 2.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+
Samsung Galaxy S8, S9, S10Samsung Adaptive Fast ChargingAnker PowerIQ 2.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+
Samsung Galaxy S10 5GUSB Power Delivery
Sony Xperia XZ2Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0Anker PowerIQ 2.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+
Xiaomi Mi 8Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+Anker PowerIQ 2.0
Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0
USB Power Delivery

The supported fast charging standard is what your phone maker recommends. Compatible fast charging standards should also work with your phone and may give you more buying options.


These are the chargers I recommend for fast charging various USB-C Android phones. Keep your other USB-C devices in mind, as another charger might work better for all your devices.

These phones support USB Power Delivery. A USB-C PD charger offering 18W or more will usually fast charge. If you have other, larger USB-C devices to charge then consider a USB-C charger which supports your largest device.

Anker PowerPort PD 1

AUKEY PA-Y18 18W PD with Moto G6. Cable not included.

AUKEY PA-Y18 18W PD with Moto G6. Cable not included.

AUKEY PA-Y18 18W PD | Review

  • 18W USB-C PD
  • 30% smaller and lighter than the Anker PowerPort PD 1
  • Requires a separate USB-C to USB-C cable

ZMI PowerPlug Turbo | Review

  • 45W USB-C PD
  • Larger and more output than a phone needs, but cheaper than smaller 18W options
  • Includes a USB-C to USB-C cable

These are the power banks I recommend for fast charging various USB-C Android phones. Keep your other USB-C devices in mind, as another power bank might work better for all your devices.

I’m only recommending up to 10,000mAh power banks. If you need 20,000mAh or more capacity there are suitable power banks available.

These phones support USB Power Delivery. A USB-C PD power bank offering 18W or more will usually fast charge. If you have other, larger USB-C devices to charge on the go consider a USB-C power bank which supports your largest device.

Novoo PowerCube Mini 5000 with Moto G6

Novoo PowerCube Mini 5000 with Moto G6

NOVOO PowerCube Mini 5000 | Review

  • 18W USB-C PD & Quick Charge 3.0
  • 5,000mAh
  • Among the smallest USB-C PD power banks on the market
  • Requires a separate USB-C to USB-C cable

AUKEY PB-Y13 10000 USB-C PD | Review

  • 18W USB-C PD & Quick Charge 3.0
  • 10,000mAh
  • Similar shape as your phone, easy to hold both together while charging and using
  • Requires a separate USB-C to USB-C cable

AUKEY PB-Y23 20000 Universal

  • 18W USB-C PD & Quick Charge 3.0
  • 20,000mAh
  • Thinner than many of its peers
  • Requires a separate USB-C to USB-C cable

Charging Standards

You can plug a USB-C Android phone into most any USB-C charger and it will charge. But it may not be a fast charge, which gets the battery up to 50-70% hours faster. For that you need to use a compatible fast charging standard. There are several such standards. They are listed below along with how they work.

Your choice of phone will determine what fast charging standard you’ll use. In most cases there are bigger things to consider when choosing your next Android phone. If considering a Huawei, OnePlus, or Oppo phone you should read up on their fast chargers first.

15W USB-C
  • All USB-C phones

A regular USB-C (not Power Delivery) supports 15W (5V/3A). It will work with any USB-C Android phone. Most will draw up to 10W, not the full 15W. That’s better than older USB-A chargers (5-7.5W). But not as good as their own fast chargers (15-40W).

Most USB-C Power Delivery chargers will also offer 15W USB-C.

Google 18W USB-C

Google 18W USB-C

USB Power Delivery
  • Essential Phone
  • Google Pixel series
  • LG V40
  • Razer Phone 2
  • Samsung Galaxy S10 5G*
  • Xiaomi Mi 8

USB Power Delivery (USB PD) is an open standard created by the USB Implementors Forum (USB-IF). They maintain the specifications of USB. As an open standard it is growing in popularity. This will help USB-C users live the dream of having one charger support all their devices.

USB PD supports up to 18W (5V/3A, 9V/2A) for phones, and up to 100W for larger devices. Not all USB-C devices support USB PD. A USB-C PD charger offering 9V/2A (or more amps) is required.

*The Samsung Galaxy S10 5G is breaking away from previous Samsung USB-C phones. Including the rest of the S10 line. It supports USB PD 3.0 and leverages programmable power supply for a faster charge (up to 25W). A regular USB PD charger will fast charge it fine. But a USB PD charger with PPS (like the S10 5G’s included charger) works a bit better.

AUKEY PB-Y13 10000 USB-C PD with Moto G6

AUKEY PB-Y13 10000 USB-C PD QC 3.0 port connected to Moto G6

Qualcomm Quick Charge 3.0
  • HTC U12 Plus
  • LG G6/G7
  • LG V30
  • Nokia 6.1 (2018)
  • Nokia 8
  • Red Hydrogen One
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 9 (Quick Charge 2.0)
  • Samsung Galaxy S8 (Quick Charge 2.0)
  • Samsung Galaxy S10 (Quick Charge 2.0)
  • Sony Xperia XZ2

Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 3.0 (QC 3.0) is the most popular fast charging standard on the market. Qualcomm’s SnapDragon CPU is common in Android phones. And Quick Charge is an optional add-on. The standard has been around for years. As it supports backwards compatibility there is a huge ecosystem available.

QC 3.0 supports 18W (5V/3A, 9V/2A, 12V/1.5A). Officially a Quick Charge 3.0 charger is required to fast charge. Unofficially an Anker PowerIQ 2.0 works just as well. Samsung and Motorola fast chargers are also compatible, if a bit slower. You could also use an older QC 2.0 charger, but it’ll be a bit slower.

QC 3.0 is most often found on USB-A ports and works with a USB-C to USB-A cable. It is also available on USB-C ports, but such chargers are less common. It is also worth noting having QC 3.0 on a USB-C port is against USB-C standards.

Qualcomm Quick Charge 4+
  • LG V40
  • Razer Phone 2
  • Xiaomi Mi 8

Qualcomm’s Quick Charge 4+ (QC 4+) is the newest iteration of Quick Charge. It was built to be USB-C compliant and work alongside USB Power Delivery.

A Quick Charge 4+ device can fast charge one of three ways:

  • Programmable power supply (PPS), up to 27W
  • USB Power Delivery, up to 18W
  • Quick Charge 3.0, up to 18W

Which method used is determined by the Qualcomm chip in the device. With a QC 4+ phone you can use a QC 4+ charger, a QC 3.0 charger, or a USB PD charger with equal results. It is compatible with Anker PowerIQ 2.0, Motorola TurboPower, and Samsung Adaptive Fast Charging. Though only PowerIQ 2.0 can offer the same 18W output.

Anker PowerPort II PD ports

Anker PowerPort II PD ports

Anker PowerIQ 2.0
  • HTC U12 Plus
  • LG G6/G7
  • LG V40
  • Motorola Moto G6
  • Nokia 6.1 (2018)
  • Nokia 8
  • Razer Phone 2
  • Red Hydrogen One
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 8
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 9
  • Samsung Galaxy S8
  • Samsung Galaxy S9
  • Samsung Galaxy S10
  • Sony Xperia XZ2
  • Xiaomi Mi 8

Anker’s PowerIQ 2.0 (PIQ 2.0) is a charger side only fast charging solution. Anker doesn’t have their tech installed in any phones or other devices.

PIQ 2.0 supports 18W (5V/3A, 9V/2A, 12V/1.5A). To make the most of a PIQ 2.0 charger you’ll want a phone that supports Quick Charge. Or a Motorola or Samsung phone. PIQ 2.0 mimics Quick Charge and charges at the same rate.

PowerIQ 2.0 is only found on USB-A ports currently. It’ll work with a USB-C to USB-A cable.

Samsung Adaptive Fast Charger

Samsung Adaptive Fast Charger

Samsung Adaptive Fast Charging
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 8
  • Samsung Galaxy Note 9
  • Samsung Galaxy S8
  • Samsung Galaxy S9
  • Samsung Galaxy S10

Samsung’s Adaptive Fast Charging is best viewed as a weaker version of Quick Charge. Their chargers are distinctive, sporting a USB-A port on the side rather than the end.

Adaptive Fast Charging supports 15W (5V/2A, 9V/1.67A). While compatible with Quick Charge, Samsung’s charger isn’t ideal for those phones. Its lower total output could mean a slower charge.

Motorola TurboPower
  • Motorola Moto G6

Motorola’s TurboPower is included with their USB-C phones. Like Samsung it is a weak version of Quick Charge. Unlike Samsung it is less compatible with other standards. The Moto G6 won’t fast charge using PowerIQ 2.0 or Quick Charge over USB-C.

TurboPower supports 15W (5V/3A, 9V/1.6A, 12V/1.2A). That output is the same as regular USB-C. But the Moto G6 charges at half the rate with USB-C as it does with TurboPower. While compatible with Quick Charge, Motorola’s charger isn’t ideal for those phones as it has weaker total output.

Huawei SuperCharge
  • Huawei Mate 10
  • Huawei Mate 20
  • Huawei Mate X
  • Huawei P10
  • Huawei P20
  • Huawei P30

Huawei’s SuperCharge is a different beast from other fast charging standards. Its design makes it the fastest and coolest charger for a phone. But in such a way that makes it incompatible with all other USB-C devices.

It increases both the voltage and the current going into the phone. Most other fast charging standards only increase the voltage. This allows Huawei to recharge their phones at either 22.5W (4.5V/5A, 5V/4.5A, 9V/2A) or 40W (5V/2A, 9V/2A, 10V/4A). To keep the higher heat from the phone’s battery the conversion circuits are housed in the charger. This keeps the phone cool. But it also means the phone can’t fast charge without the Huawei charger. And the charger won’t work with any other USB-C device.

OnePlus Dash Charging/Oppo VOOC Flash Charge
  • OnePlus 6T

OnePlus’ Dash Charging is actually Oppo’s VOOC Flash Charge technology. OnePlus licenses and rebrands it from Oppo. So both OnePlus and Oppo phones will use this fast charging standard.

It has a unique approach to fast charging. It increases the current, rather than the voltage. This has the advantage of less voltage conversion during charging (more efficient). But the higher current generates much more heat. To deal with this the conversion circuits are housed in the charger, not the phone. It has the same issues as Huawei’s fast charger. The phone can’t fast charge without that specific charger. And the charger is useless with everything else.

OnePlus Warp Charge 30
  • OnePlus 6T McLaren Edition
  • OnePlus 7 Pro

A newer version of OnePlus Dash. It works much the same way, increasing current rather than voltage. The conversion circuits are still housed in the charger, protecting the phone from heat. Like Dash this makes the phone incompatible with other fast charging standards. A Warp Charge 30 charger can used with older OnePlus phones. But will only charge at the phone’s max draw rate.

ASUS BoostMaster Technology
  • ASUS ZenFone

ASUS’ BoostMaster Technology doesn’t boost much. Its output is less than regular USB-C.

BoostMaster supports 10W (5V/2A). That’s not actually fast charging speeds by most definitions. For a second charger you’d be better off getting a 15W USB-C charger. It’ll perform the same will is easier to find than an ASUS branded charger.

Some ASUS phones support Quick Charge 3.0, which is faster than the ASUS standard or USB-C.

Learn more about USB Fast Charging Standards.


Fast Chargers & Battery Life

You may have read that fast charging a will reduce the battery life. There is some truth to that. But all things considered it isn’t worth worrying about.

How Lithium Batteries Charge

Fast charging operates at higher wattages, often with higher voltages. More watts mean more heat. But modern device design has this in mind. And Lithium batteries recharge in steps, which is different than older types of batteries.

  • Step 1: Constant current is applied, but capacity lags. It is like stretching a rubber band and waiting. The energy (capacity) will catch up after a lag.
  • Step 2: Current drops off and capacity increases. The rubber band has been released and the energy absorbed.
  • Step 3: Current stops as the battery is charged and ready for use.
  • Step 4: Charging goes into standby mode. It will top off the battery as needed, using low current.

Fast chargers operate in Step 1. They put as much power into the battery before it reaches peak voltage. As such fast chargers do most of their work before the battery reaches 50%. As the charge progresses into Step 2 the total output continues to reduce. By 70-80% fast charging has stopped. Step 3 and 4 never see fast charging output.

Step 1 is the least damaging period for a charging battery. Not as much waste heat is generated as there is lots of capacity to fill. Where heat can be generated is in Step 2 by using high output voltage. But that is the step where fast charging drops off and ends, taking high output voltage with it.

The phone itself controls the power brought into its battery. Chargers do not push power, devices draw it. There are voltage and temperature sensors which work with the charge control circuit. If things get too hot the phone reduces or stops its power draw.

You can read more on how lithium batteries charger here.

Low Cost Battery Replacement

A lithium battery can be configured to maximize battery life at the cost of capacity. But this has to be done by the device manufacturer, the end user can’t make the change. Consumer device makers opt for more capacity (more operational time). For most this provides a better user experience. And the battery or device can always be replaced (more money for the manufacturer).

Replacing the battery is a 2-3 year old smartphone is inexpensive. Android phones vary, but the batteries are usually $10 or less plus the cost of labor. Any phone repair shop should be able to handle the replacement and give you a quote.

Consider how much time you’ll spend trying to maximize your phone’s battery life. Now compare that to how many hours of work it takes to earn $50. Over the course of 2-3 years you’re better off replacing the battery.

Easy Steps for Better Battery Life

If you want to be proactive these are easy, reasonable things you can do to get a bit more life out of your battery.

  • Charge the phone more often. More frequent, shallower charges are better than less frequent, deeper charger.
  • Sleep or turn off the phone during charging. Placing it face down keeps it from waking up due to camera detection.
  • Charge at moderate temperatures. Never charge at freezing temperatures.